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Unfortunate Outcomes: quell the brawls over Confederate statues

To+what+lengths+is+hate+speech+protected+by+the+first+amendment%3F
To what lengths is hate speech protected by the first amendment?

To what lengths is hate speech protected by the first amendment?

To what lengths is hate speech protected by the first amendment?

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The events that unfolded at Charlottesville, Virginia, has caused major controversy. One of the main brow furrows has been on the questioning and immediate action to the removal of Confederate statues. At the center of the chaos stood the Confederate memorial of Robert E. Lee, one of the major commanders of the Confederacy. As I watched the VICE news crew take lead on the story, I watched in horror and anxiousness. I gaped at the atrocities releasing from the mouths of the ‘alt-rights’ and their calls for ethnic cleansing. But I cried as the VICE crew members interviewed some of the local Virginians, one of who depicted her discomfort with the statue. She had stated her discontent: the statue has always provided supremacy and elitism for whites. Some locals using the statute to justify their morals.

But the bigger question has been if the removal of the statutes is an effort to erasure of history. However, why would we memorialize and preserve treasonous symbols of a dark time in American history in the first place?

The Confederacy was formed to preserve liberty and liberation for whites. According to an interview with NPR, Jane Dailey, associate professor of history at the University of Chicago, said, “Most of the people who were involved in erecting the monuments were not necessarily erecting a monument to the past. But were rather, erecting them toward a white supremacist future.” Along with the most recent study of Confederate statues and monuments, the creation of these symbols of supremacy rose during the early 1900s as well as the 1950s and 60s; both times of intense racial tensions and actions.

The majority of these monuments were not built with the intention to commemorate fallen heroes, but to inflict oppression.

The terrifying events that took place in Charlottesville, Virginia, have shaken me. I was struck with an undeniable fear as I watched untamed emotions erupt as I watched the news, stared into the television, peered into my phone and read the headlines. The media reports roared through my head as continuous shouts of hate, but my unconscious stirred to channel change. A compulsion and necessity for change.

I am not afraid to use my influence across social media; my heavy impediment on social and political issues that have stemmed from my distaste of the current administration. I use my platform to increase awareness and raise my voice in a way that I can. The lack of empathy that came from the mouth from President Donald Trump left American’s dumbfounded in the aftermath of the ‘Unite the Right’ rally where one courageous counter protester, Heather Heyer, was murdered when a car plowed into the protesters.

According to VICE News on Sept. 13, “the House and Senate sent the White House a joint resolution, which passed with unanimous support, that condemns the “racist violence” in Charlottesville and calls on the president and his administration to “speak out against hate groups that espouse racism, extremism, xenophobia, anti-Semitism and white supremacy.” The bill also labels the car plowing into the crowd and killing Heather Hayer as an act of ‘domestic terrorism’.

Until Mr. Trump realizes that there are no sides when fascists seek to exterminate human lives, how can it be possible to sympathize them? Have we not learned that history tends to repeat itself?

 

 

 

 

 

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Unfortunate Outcomes: quell the brawls over Confederate statues